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Speech: Alcohol and Underage Drinking
" Alcohol in essential tremor and other movement disorders". National Institute on Drug Abuse (nida). In Europe it is usually expressed as milligrams of alcohol per..
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Airline Safety Awareness on Terrorists
Fielding: At first it appeared as though, gee, this is great, you know, they got the - they found them and there was quick coordination..
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The Secret Agent Light

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The Cosmological Argument for the existence of God

Retrieved article mentioning the existence of such an argument, but not necessarily endorsing. If, on the one hand, God is thought to have a cause of


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Human Sacrifice, the central rite of Aztec Religion

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Inter - Religious Dialogue - Feminism


inter - Religious Dialogue - Feminism

theoretical discussions make much use of the tripartite model of exclusivism, inclusivism, and pluralism. Motherhood as Metaphor: Engendering Interreligious Dialogue, asks these questions of feminist theologians from across a range of religious traditions to investigate whether feminist theological reflections might sustain the use of motherhood as metaphor. 1989 they stressed as their objectives among others the "deepening of ones own and other faiths, from a womans perspective and "fostering mutuality, respect, solidarity, and sisterhood by overcoming divisive barriers." In each case the women examined both the liberative and oppressive aspects of their. Ariarajah, Wesley 1999 Not Without My Neighbour (Geneva: WCC Publications, Risk Book Series).

Inter - Religious Dialogue - Feminism
inter - Religious Dialogue - Feminism

Gössmann, Elisabeth 1996 "Feministische Kritik an universalen Wahrheitsansprüchen" in Christlicher Glaube in multireligiöser Gesellschaft. Gössmann 1996: 312-50; see especially the section Der interreligiöse Dialog und die Pluralität der weiblichen Standpunkte,. Much has been written on the theological challenges of religious pluralism already, but it is also important to examine the theological, political, and spiritual dimensions of the mutual interrelationship between pluralism and different religions. The entire local congregation had turned out in full force, but for them to receive just two women delegates and no men was rather a shock. Thus, I generally drag my feet into discussions of the Divine Feminine when invited (as my title for this reflection suggests, Id be more comfortable in conversations on the Divine Feminist). The latter began near the beginning of the 19th century whereas the "interfaith movement" is considered to have begun with the historic meeting of people from different religions at the Chicago Worlds Parliament of Religions in 1893. They are recovering womens own voices and contributions, their religious roles and rituals, feminine images and metaphors used for constructs of Ultimate Reality, and womens heritage in spirituality and mysticism. If one studies the dynamics of dialogue, the absence of women in the sense of either their marginalization or complete invisibility is another example of the patriarchal oppression of women. Yet many scholarly publications on religion still seem to give too little or no recognition to the profound epistemological, methodological, and substantive changes which contemporary gender studies, especially womens scholarship and feminist theories, but also the growing field of mens studies in religion, have brought. A few works, such as Maureen ONeills Women Speaking, Women Listening,4 have looked at womens involvement with interreligious dialogue, but there has been little of a feminist reception or critique of the interfaith movement and theological debate about dialogue so far.5This is also evident from the. While articulated in symbolic language rooted in womens experience, motherhood is more widely applicable by invitation to humanity at large. Here is the second point, equally important: While the symbolisms may be rooted in subject-positions gendered female, the experiences they describe are not bound by gender or biology.


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